Sunday, March 27, 2016

Tech Leaders: Steve Jobs & Bill Gates Talks Shop In Epic Interview About Internet Of Things

Welcome back to MicroCapCompany.com's video lecture series by prominent founders and CEOs.  Last month we featured Carl Icahn talking about his investments and how he managed to acquire a large portfolio of public companies.  This month we feature an oldie but a goodies, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates in the same interview.  In this interview the foresee the future of computers and technology.  Here at MicroCapCompany.com we expect all hope to see start-ups, micro cap companies and small cap companies reach the level of Apple Inc and Microsoft Inc....so learn from those whom have accomplished what you are looking to accomplish:



-Hope this was helpful

-Nick

______________________________________________________________
About the Author: Nicholas Coriano is a Business Consultant and Planning Guru.  He is a graduate of The University of Connecticut Business School and the John Marshall Law School in Chicago.  He has worked at Merrill Lynch, The New York Stock Exchange and is currently a partner at Cervitude Investor Relations, which specializes in Investor Relations for companies valued under $1 Billion USD.

About MicroCapCompany.COM: MicroCapCompany.COM (The Blog) is a blog focused on providing articles, news and information on the micro cap sector and start-ups.  The Blog is a free service offered by Cervitude™ Investor Relations (a micro cap investor relations firm) and offers compensated research reports and business plan writing services for micro cap companies and penny stocks.  If there is a particular topic you would like to see covered on The Blog, email CervitudeNetwork@gmail.com, If you would like to advertise on The Blog, click here. 



Have tips, advice, comment or suggestions about this article??  Comment below or start a conversation by mentioning us on twitter! -

Saturday, February 27, 2016

Finance Giant Carl Icahn Talks Investing & Investments, Hostile Takeovers and being an Activist Shareholder

Welcome to MicroCapCompany.com's Video Lecture Series for micro cap companies, small cap companies and start-ups.  This month we are featuring DealBook Conference 2015 lecture on Activist Investing featuring Finance Giant Carl Icahn.  He has taken substantial or controlling positions in various corporations including RJR Nabisco, TWA, Texaco, Phillips Petroleum, Western Union, Gulf & Western, Viacom, Uniroyal, Dan River, Marshall Field's, E-II (Culligan and Samsonite), American Can, USX, Marvel Comics, Revlon, Imclone, Federal-Mogul, Fairmont Hotels, Blockbuster, Kerr-McGee, Time Warner, Netflix, Motorola, and Herbalife.  At MicroCapCompany.com we believe you should learn from people who have done it.  Enjoy.



-Hope this was helpful

-Nick

______________________________________________________________
About the Author: Nicholas Coriano is a Business Consultant and Planning Guru.  He is a graduate of The University of Connecticut Business School and the John Marshall Law School in Chicago.  He has worked at Merrill Lynch, The New York Stock Exchange and is currently a partner at Cervitude Investor Relations, which specializes in Investor Relations for companies valued under $1 Billion USD.

About MicroCapCompany.COM: MicroCapCompany.COM (The Blog) is a blog focused on providing articles, news and information on the micro cap sector and start-ups.  The Blog is a free service offered by Cervitude™ Investor Relations (a micro cap investor relations firm) and offers compensated research reports and business plan writing services for micro cap companies and penny stocks.  If there is a particular topic you would like to see covered on The Blog, email CervitudeNetwork@gmail.com, If you would like to advertise on The Blog, click here. 

Have tips, advice, comment or suggestions about this article??  Comment below or start a conversation by mentioning us on twitter! -

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

What is a EPS (Earnings Per Share) Mean?

The portion of a company's profit allocated to each outstanding share of common stock. Earnings per share serves as an indicator of a company's profitability.

Calculated as: (Net Income-Dividends on Preferred Stocks)/Average Outstanding Shares

Earnings Per Share (EPS)

When calculating, it is more accurate to use a weighted average number of shares outstanding over the reporting term, because the number of shares outstanding can change over time. However, data sources sometimes simplify the calculation by using the number of shares outstanding at the end of the period.

Calculating EPS:

Earnings per share (basic formula)

\mbox{Earnings Per Share}=\frac{\mbox{Profit- Preferred Dividends}}{\mbox{Weighted Average Common Shares}}

Earnings per share (net income formula)

\mbox{Earnings Per Share}=\frac{\mbox{Net Income - Preferred Dividends}}{\mbox{Average Common Shares}}

Earnings per share (continuing operations formula)

\mbox{Earnings Per Share}=\frac{\mbox{Income from Continuing Operations - Preferred dividends}}{\mbox{Weighted Average Common Shares}}


---Hope this was helpful!
-Nick
______________________________________________________________
About the Author: Nicholas Coriano is a Business Consultant and Planning Guru.  He is a graduate of The University of Connecticut Business School and the John Marshall Law School in Chicago.  He has worked at Merrill Lynch, The New York Stock Exchange and as an Investor Relations Agent & Consultant to Micro Cap Companies and Penny Stocks.  He is the founder and author of The MicroCapCompany.com a blog focused on providing information and advice to Micro Cap Company Executives and Investors.  You can also find him blogging about Social Media, SEO, Web Development and Tech on PushYourRank.com

About MicroCapCompany.COM: MicroCapCompany.COM (The Blog) is a blog focused on providing articles, news and information on the micro cap sector and start-ups.  The Blog is a free service offered by Cervitude™ Investor Relations (a micro cap investor relations firm) and offers compensated research reports and business plan writing services for micro cap companies and penny stocks.  If there is a particular topic you would like to see covered on The Blog, email CervitudeNetwork@gmail.com, If you would like to advertise on The Blog, click here. 

Have tips, advice, comment or suggestions about this article??  Comment below or start a conversation by mentioning us on twitter! -

Sunday, December 27, 2015

What is a P/E (Price-to-Earnings) Ratio?

The Price-to-Earnings Ratio or P/E ratio is a ratio for valuing a company that measures its current share price relative to its per-share earnings.

The price-earnings ratio can be calculated as:

Market Value per Share / Earnings per Share

For example, suppose that a company is currently trading at $43 a share and its earnings over the last 12 months were $1.95 per share. The P/E ratio for the stock could then be calculated as 43/1.95, or 22.05.

EPS is most often derived from the last four quarters. This form of the price-earnings ratio is called trailing P/E, which may be calculated by subtracting a company’s share value at the beginning of the 12-month period from its value at the period’s end, adjusting for stock splits if there have been any. Sometimes, price-earnings can also be taken from analysts’ estimates of earnings expected during the next four quarters. This form of price-earnings is also called projected or forward P/E. A third, less common variation uses the sum of the last two actual quarters and the estimates of the next two quarters.

The price-earnings ratio is also sometimes known as the price multiple or the earnings multiple.

VERSIONS

There are multiple versions of the P/E ratio, depending on whether earnings are projected or realized, and the type of earnings.

"Trailing P/E" uses net income for the most recent 12-month period, divided by the weighted average number of common shares in issue during the period. This is the most common meaning of "P/E" if no other qualifier is specified. Monthly earnings data for individual companies are not available, and in any case usually fluctuate seasonally, so the previous four quarterly earnings reports are used and earnings per share are updated quarterly. Note, each company chooses its own financial year so the timing of updates varies from one to another.

"Trailing P/E from continued operations" uses operating earnings, which exclude earnings from discontinued operations, extraordinary items (e.g. one-off windfalls and write-downs), and accounting changes.

"Forward P/E": Instead of net income, this uses estimated net earnings over next 12 months. Estimates are typically derived as the mean of those published by a select group of analysts (selection criteria are rarely cited).

As an example, if stock A is trading at $24 and the earnings per share for the most recent 12-month period is $3, then stock A has a P/E ratio of 24/3 or 8. Put another way, the purchaser of the stock is paying $8 for every dollar of earnings. Companies with losses (negative earnings) or no profit have an undefined P/E ratio (usually shown as "not applicable" or "N/A"); sometimes, however, a negative P/E ratio may be shown.

Some people mistakenly use the formula market capitalization / net income to calculate the P/E ratio. This formula often gives the same answer as market price / earnings per share, but if new capital has been issued it gives the wrong answer, as market capitalization = market price × current number of shares whereas earnings per share= net income / weighted average number of shares.

Variations on the standard trailing and forward P/E ratios are common. Generally, alternative P/E measures substitute different measures of earnings, such as rolling averages over longer periods of time (to attempt to "smooth" volatile or cyclical earnings, for example), or "corrected" earnings figures that exclude certain extraordinary events or one-off gains or losses. The definitions may not be standardized. For companies that are loss-making, or whose earnings are expected to change dramatically, a "primary" P/E can be used instead, based on the earnings projections made for the next years to which a discount calculation is applied.

---Hope this was helpful!
-Nick
______________________________________________________________
About the Author: Nicholas Coriano is a Business Consultant and Planning Guru.  He is a graduate of The University of Connecticut Business School and the John Marshall Law School in Chicago.  He has worked at Merrill Lynch, The New York Stock Exchange and as an Investor Relations Agent & Consultant to Micro Cap Companies and Penny Stocks.  He is the founder and author of The MicroCapCompany.com a blog focused on providing information and advice to Micro Cap Company Executives and Investors.  You can also find him blogging about Social Media, SEO, Web Development and Tech on PushYourRank.com

About MicroCapCompany.COM: MicroCapCompany.COM (The Blog) is a blog focused on providing articles, news and information on the micro cap sector and start-ups.  The Blog is a free service offered by Cervitude™ Investor Relations (a micro cap investor relations firm) and offers compensated research reports and business plan writing services for micro cap companies and penny stocks.  If there is a particular topic you would like to see covered on The Blog, email CervitudeNetwork@gmail.com, If you would like to advertise on The Blog, click here. 

Have tips, advice, comment or suggestions about this article??  Comment below or start a conversation by mentioning us on twitter! -